Meet Tovisoa

Tovisoa is hopeful as she waits for fistula surgery that could change her life.

Tovisoa's Story

Tovisoa is hopeful as she waits for fistula surgery that could change her life. She developed obstetric fistula in 2017, the result of a difficult labor that lasted for two days. Her baby did not survive. Not long after, she found that she had begun to leak urine uncontrollably.

Embarrassed, she didn’t dare to attend family gatherings or social events, for fear that others would speak badly of her because of her condition. Tovisoa is extremely shy, and the judgment she already experienced and felt was very hard.

But one day, her aunt, Ndatsaha, explained that she had suffered from the same condition. And she told Tovisoa about SALFA’s hospital in Morondava, which offered free fistula treatment. She offered to escort Tovisoa to the hospital herself.

So, on the day that a team from Fistula Foundation arrived, they found Tovisoa with Ndatsaha at her side, quiet and hopeful and looking forward to treatment that would restore her life, the way it restored her aunt’s.

About Madagascar

  • Population: 24,430,325
  • Average Births per Woman: 4.12
  • Female Literacy: 62.6%
  • Population Living in Poverty: 75.3% (less than $1.25/day)
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Obstetric fistula happens most frequently in rural areas, where emergency medical care is not easily accessible. A woman’s risk of developing fistula is also exacerbated by cultural misunderstanding about doctors and surgery. Madagascar faces both of these challenges: its infrastructure is poor, which can make travel to the hospital complicated and dangerous. Also, there is…

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Fistula Foundation’s work in Madagascar wouldn’t be the same without the amazing support of our partner, Icon. Read their Giveback recap blog post below, and the stories of women at SALFA, our partner in Madagascar: How You Changed These Women’s Lives 12/19/17 written by Natalie Pattillo How You Changed These Women’s Lives As a women-led…

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