Meet Solange

Solange spent the majority of her teenage years suffering from obstetric fistula.

Solange's Story

Solange was married and became pregnant at the age of 15. She received pre-natal care throughout her pregnancy, and when her labor began, Solange’s family called a traditional birth attendant instead of traveling to the nearest health center. However, it soon became clear that her labor was complicated.

Solange’s family then decided to make the 2-hour walk to the health center – Solange had to walk too, despite her excruciating labor pains. When she arrived, the nurse on duty could do little for her and referred her to another hospital, which required another 6 hours of travel by foot, boat, and taxi—not to mention a large financial cost for her family. Sadly, when she finally arrived at the hospital and completed her delivery, her baby was stillborn. She also realized that she was constantly leaking urine.

Grieving, Solange traveled back home, where she found a letter from her husband. Translated, it read: “Go away! Go back to your parents’ house!” Her emotional pain was unbearable—she had lost her baby and been cast out by her husband. Her community also ostracized her because of her smell.

Thankfully, her family continued to support her. After a year of living with obstetric fistula, Solange began to see another man, who loved and accepted her despite her condition. She became pregnant again, and was able to give birth to a healthy baby by caesarian section.

A friend referred Solange to Freedom from Fistula, one of Fistula Foundation’s partners in Tamatave, Madagascar. She traveled to Tamatave, and was finally able to receive treatment.

Now 20 years old, Solange is finally dry. After undergoing fistula repair surgery, her self-confidence has returned. Now that her fistula is gone, Solange has found new joy and hopes to live life to the fullest!

About Madagascar

  • Population: 24,430,325
  • Average Births per Woman: 4.12
  • Female Literacy: 62.6%
  • Population Living in Poverty: 75.3% (less than $1.25/day)
Read More

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Read Another Woman’s Story

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    Everlyn developed fistula during her second pregnancy. Shunned and stigmatized by her own family, her husband stood by her side until she received successful treatment through the Action on Fistula program.

  • Elizabeth

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    Elizabeth is mother to ten children. For nearly a year, she suffered in shame, uncontrollably leaking urine. A doctor misdiagnosed her condition as a urinary tract infection. Without a way to stop the incontinence, Elizabeth went to great lengths to hide her injury.

  • Wilmina

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    “The last 22 years have been years of great pain, loss and very deep sorrows. I lost my baby, later lost my marriage, lost friends, and lost my only family (my parents). Fistula robbed me of everything that I once valued, and I have been left very empty.”

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    Kenya

    After suffering five miscarriages, Jane prepared to deliver her first child. But two days of difficult labor left Jane with an obstetric fistula. At home, she became traumatized by isolation and mistreatment from her husband, who had taken another wife. Her sister, Elizabeth, stepped in.

  • Pastor Raphael

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  • Queen

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    “When my husband saw the many health issues I had, he despised me, he called me names and always told me in the face that I was more than crippled.” She was left on her own and most of the time starving. She reached at a point that she could not withstand the mistreatment and she went back to her parents. After a few years her parents died. “I walk like a crippled woman, there is nothing that I own on this earth, I don’t have a husband, I don’t have a baby. My life is so empty.” She has said that her deepest desire has been to die a clean woman. But at Gynocare, where she received fistula surgery through the Action on Fistula program, she is happy. Here, she feels loved and valued. She knows she has a family at Gynocare.

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  • Kaudha

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    Kaudha is from eastern Uganda. At age 27, she developed a fistula after spending hours in labor with her third child. Unfortunately, the baby did not survive, and Kaudha’s condition left her feeling isolated from friends and loved ones. But in fall 2015, her story—and her outlook—changed dramatically.

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    Ana

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    Today, Ana is 18 years old, with an enthusiastic outlook and bubbly smile. That wasn’t always the case. Ana was just shy of 16 years old when she became pregnant. Everything went well, until it was time to deliver. Her labor was excruciating, and lasted for days.

  • Salome

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    Salome's labor began at night. She sought help from her mother-in-law, who immediately called Salome's husband - by cultural norms, the only one who could give permission for Salome to seek help at a hospital. But he had turned his phone off for the night and was unreachable. Her mother-in-law tried all she could throughout the night to help Salome deliver her child. By the time Salome's husband returned the call the next morning to advise that she be taken immediately to the hospital, it was too late. The baby did not survive, and Salome had developed an obstetric fistula.

  • Hauwa

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    Hauwa was 60 years old when she became aware that the fistula she had suffered with for over 40 years could be repaired for free at our partner hospital, Evangel Vesico-Vaginal Fistula Center (EVFC).

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  • Annonciata

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  • Kemzo

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    Kemzo endured two to three days of excruciating labor before being taken to get a C-section at a public hospital in Vangaindrano. The prolonged obstructed labor had resulted in obstetric fistula.

  • Tahinomenjanahary

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    Tahinomenjanahary went in to labor at the age of 17. Her labor was excruciating, but she did not begin the journey to the nearest hospital until she had been in labor for more than a day. In total, she labored for three days. The baby did not survive.