Meet Solange

Solange spent the majority of her teenage years suffering from obstetric fistula.

Solange's Story

Solange was married and became pregnant at the age of 15. She received pre-natal care throughout her pregnancy, and when her labor began, Solange’s family called a traditional birth attendant instead of traveling to the nearest health center. However, it soon became clear that her labor was complicated.

Solange’s family then decided to make the 2-hour walk to the health center – Solange had to walk too, despite her excruciating labor pains. When she arrived, the nurse on duty could do little for her and referred her to another hospital, which required another 6 hours of travel by foot, boat, and taxi—not to mention a large financial cost for her family. Sadly, when she finally arrived at the hospital and completed her delivery, her baby was stillborn. She also realized that she was constantly leaking urine.

Grieving, Solange traveled back home, where she found a letter from her husband. Translated, it read: “Go away! Go back to your parents’ house!” Her emotional pain was unbearable—she had lost her baby and been cast out by her husband. Her community also ostracized her because of her smell.

Thankfully, her family continued to support her. After a year of living with obstetric fistula, Solange began to see another man, who loved and accepted her despite her condition. She became pregnant again, and was able to give birth to a healthy baby by caesarian section.

A friend referred Solange to Freedom from Fistula, one of Fistula Foundation’s partners in Tamatave, Madagascar. She traveled to Tamatave, and was finally able to receive treatment.

Now 20 years old, Solange is finally dry. After undergoing fistula repair surgery, her self-confidence has returned. Now that her fistula is gone, Solange has found new joy and hopes to live life to the fullest!

About Madagascar

  • Population: 24,430,325
  • Average Births per Woman: 4.12
  • Female Literacy: 62.6%
  • Population Living in Poverty: 75.3% (less than $1.25/day)
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Obstetric fistula happens most frequently in rural areas, where emergency medical care is not easily accessible. A woman’s risk of developing fistula is also exacerbated by cultural misunderstanding about doctors and surgery. Madagascar faces both of these challenges: its infrastructure is poor, which can make travel to the hospital complicated and dangerous. Also, there is…

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Fistula Foundation’s work in Madagascar wouldn’t be the same without the amazing support of our partner, Icon. Read their Giveback recap blog post below, and the stories of women at SALFA, our partner in Madagascar: How You Changed These Women’s Lives 12/19/17 written by Natalie Pattillo How You Changed These Women’s Lives As a women-led…

Read Another Woman’s Story

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    Angola

    Flavia is a shy 17 year old girl who was married when she was just 15. Soon after, she became pregnant. Her labor began at home, but the family was unprepared when the labor became obstructed. Not knowing what to do, they finally took her to a hospital.

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    Naresia is a Masai girl from a rural village in Kenya. Only five months ago, at the age of 14, Naresia gave birth to a baby. After a prolonged and difficult labor, she awoke to find her bed soaked with urine. The doctors informed her that the delivery process had left her with an obstetric fistula and she was now incontinent.

  • Everlyn

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  • Bategna

    Madagascar

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  • Romenisoa

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  • Fanny

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    Fanny became pregnant by her boyfriend at 15. She was in labor for over 3 days, seeking medical care. Her family had to row a canoe for 6 hours to reach a hospital before Fanny finally delivered her baby through cesarean section. Fanny developed an obstetric fistula due to this ordeal, but her mother Dorcas was determined to find help for her daughter so that she could live a good life.

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    Kenya

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    Fatima

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    Fatima lives in Sudan. She went into labor at the age of 16, but initially didn't have access to a hospital. By the time she was taken to the hospital, the baby was dead, and Fatima developed an obstetric fistula. Her husband divorced her, leaving Fatima emotionally shattered by the loss of her husband and first born child.

  • Kemzo

    Madagascar

    Kemzo endured two to three days of excruciating labor before being taken to get a C-section at a public hospital in Vangaindrano. The prolonged obstructed labor had resulted in obstetric fistula.

  • Naomi

    Tanzania

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  • Ravony

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  • Seline

    Kenya

    Seline lives in a small village in the remote region of West Pokot, Kenya. She did not go to school and married young, as is tradition in this pastoralist community. She went into labor with her fourth child about three years ago, preferring to give birth at home with a traditional birth attendant from her village. Only 18% of women give birth in a health center in this region of Kenya, far below the national average of 44%

  • Bernard

    Kenya

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    Kabuli

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    Kabuli, from Afghanistan, is the third of four wives. When she developed a fistula after enduring obstructed labor without any emergency medical care, her husband forced her into isolation within his home. Living in shame, Kabuli thought she would be miserable for the rest of her life.

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    Lia

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  • Yvonne

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