Meet Selina

Selina, a traditional birth attendant from remote West Pokot, Kenya, helped eight women from her village get life-changing fistula surgery. And she’s not done yet.

Selina's Story

Selina lives in West Pokot, Kenya, a pastoral region along Kenya’s Great Rift Valley. She works as a traditional birth attendant in this remote, rural area, where most women deliver at home.

After learning from a local radio ad about free fistula treatment offered at Cherangany Nursing Home in Kitale, she took it upon herself to find women in her village who might be suffering with fistula, a devastating childbirth injury that causes incontinence and often leads to social isolation.

In July 2016, Selina brought eight women to Cherangany, where Fistula Foundation has been supporting treatment through our Action on Fistula program since 2014. Not only did Selina bring these women to the facility, she chose to stay with them and continued to provide support while they recovered from surgery. Thanks to Selina, all eight women received life-changing treatment. And she’s not done—she wants to continue searching for women in need of fistula repair.

Selina (pictured above, center) helped eight women from her village get life-changing fistula surgery.

 

About Kenya

  • Population: 45,010,056
  • Average Births per Woman: 3.54
  • Female Literacy: 84.2%
  • Population Living in Poverty: 43.4% (less than $1.25/day)
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