Meet Salha

Salha had a complicated and prolonged labor before she was finally brought to a hospital in the Mtwara region of Tanzania. There she received an emergency C-section section, but it was too late. Tragically, Salha’s baby had already died. A few days later, Salha realized she was leaking urine.

Salha's Story

Embarrassed and confused, she did not know what was happening to her. When Salha’s husband discovered her condition, he abandoned her while she was still in hospital.

Salha tried to seek treatment from various district and regional hospitals but was unsuccessful. Hope was restored in October 2012, however, when she met an ambassador from our partner site, Comprehensive Community Based Rehabilitation in Tanzania (CCBRT). The ambassador diagnosed Salha with obstetric fistula and immediately referred her to CCBRT for treatment. He organized her transport to Dar es Salaam, covering her costs using the Vodafone M-PESA system, and Salha was on her way.

Salha was brought to CCBRT’s fistula ward, a comprehensive facility that opened in 2012 with brand new mechanical beds, tables and medical equipment provided by Fistula Foundation. Salha underwent a successful repair surgery and was finally dry after 12 months of suffering with a fistula. “I was well received at CCBRT,” she said. “It [the facility] makes most of us feel good even if we are in pain. The environment is fresh. Thank you to CCBRT and its partners for making this happen.”

 

 

About Tanzania

  • Population: 49,639,138
  • Average Births per Woman: 4.95
  • Female Literacy: 60.8%
  • Population Living in Poverty: 67.9% (less than $1.25/day)
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Read Another Woman’s Story

  • Flavia

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    Flavia is a shy 17 year old girl who was married when she was just 15. Soon after, she became pregnant. Her labor began at home, but the family was unprepared when the labor became obstructed. Not knowing what to do, they finally took her to a hospital.

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  • Towanda

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  • Sujata

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  • Annonciata

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  • Fatima, from Sudan (photo credit: WAHA)

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  • Lucie

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