Meet Rose

Rose developed a fistula after her very first pregnancy, and has been suffering because of it ever since. For over fifty years she struggled, never knowing that treatment was available....until recently when she met Sister Anna, the head nurse of Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Center's fistula ward in Moshi.

Rose's Story

Rose was in labor for three days before she was taken to the local clinic. Due to the limited capabilities and resources of the staff there, they referred her to the district hospital. At the hospital, doctors rushed to operate on her but it was already too late: the surgery was unable to save her baby boy, who only cried once before taking his final breath. But little did Rose know the true extent of her loss, because she soon realized that she was leaking urine continuously. She was discharged from the hospital without a diagnosis, and without any further assistance for her condition.

When Rose returned home, she felt utterly defeated. Her husband left her and married another woman. She never conceived again and led a life of isolation and sadness. A constant need to change her clothes, coupled with the fear of embarrassment and painful genital sores, forced her to stay close to the house at all times. As a result, Rose withdrew from every social activity unless her presence was absolutely required.

With a diminished capability to work on the farm because of her condition, each day Rose struggled more and more. Time and age did not solve her problems, as her hardships only continued to grow. The crucial support that she derived from her parents was lost upon their deaths, and her farm animals were stolen by thieves as word got around that she was an old woman living alone. Perhaps one of the most hopeless feelings was when Rose saw her siblings blessed with children and grandchildren while she continued to be childless and alone.

The embarrassment she felt over leaking plagued her mind at all times. “When I would be spending time with my sister’s grandchildren, they would ask me why I was not using the bathroom when my clothes would get wet,” she narrated with sadness in her eyes. Incidents like these continued to add to her grief, along with the fact that she was told that she was incontinent because she was bewitched. Rose tried seeking out traditional healers, but nothing she did could alleviate her suffering – until she met Sister Anna from Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Center (KCMC) in Moshi.

Sister Anna is the head nurse at KCMC’s fistula ward. She visited Rose’s district as part of an outreach trip that was funded by Fistula Foundation. The goal of the outreach trip was to build capacity for fistula identification, referral, and transportation to KCMC for treatment. The outreach team conducted educational activities, connected with local ambassadors, and identified and transported women suffering from fistula. Rose was one of these patients who was brought to KCMC as part of the outreach trip. After 50 years of living with a fistula, she has finally received the care she deserves and has been healed.

About Tanzania

  • Population: 49,639,138
  • Average Births per Woman: 4.95
  • Female Literacy: 60.8%
  • Population Living in Poverty: 67.9% (less than $1.25/day)
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Read Another Woman’s Story

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    Hauwa was 60 years old when she became aware that the fistula she had suffered with for over 40 years could be repaired for free at our partner hospital, Evangel Vesico-Vaginal Fistula Center (EVFC).

  • Felistas

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  • Queen

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    “When my husband saw the many health issues I had, he despised me, he called me names and always told me in the face that I was more than crippled.” She was left on her own and most of the time starving. She reached at a point that she could not withstand the mistreatment and she went back to her parents. After a few years her parents died. “I walk like a crippled woman, there is nothing that I own on this earth, I don’t have a husband, I don’t have a baby. My life is so empty.” She has said that her deepest desire has been to die a clean woman. But at Gynocare, where she received fistula surgery through the Action on Fistula program, she is happy. Here, she feels loved and valued. She knows she has a family at Gynocare.

  • Everlyn

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  • Helen

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  • Lucie

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    With a tube down her nose to her stomach, Lucie was unable to talk. Her sister, Elysa, relayed this story on her behalf.

  • Justine

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    Justine is 37 years old and lives in Bumasiki , a small village in Bugiri District in Uganda. When her labor pains began, she prepared to go to the hospital but didn’t have enough money to get there. She arrived 20 hours later after gathering sufficient funds from friends and neighbors; but by then, she had developed an obstetric fistula.

  • Zeinabou

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  • Bategna

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  • Chepotyeltyel

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  • Naomi

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  • Grace

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  • Aidah

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