Meet Reeta

Reeta arrived at International Nepal Foundation's fistula clinic with her younger son, Tej. They live in Kanchenpur, a 9 hour journey by bus from Surkhet. Reeta developed an obstetric fistula after her youngest son’s birth 33 years ago. She had delivered two sons previously at home without difficulty, but the third labor was more complicated.

Reeta's Story

After four days, she was still unable to push the baby out. A neighbor finally came and helped to safely deliver the baby, who miraculously survived. However, Reeta was soon unable to control her urine – she was wet day and night.

Reeta and her family were soon struck with another tragedy, when her husband died suddenly after a fatal fall from a tree. Reeta was forced to bring up her sons alone. Friends would sometimes visit, but they sat far from her because of the smell of urine that always accompanied her.

Some years ago, Reeta’s oldest son married. It is traditional for the son and wife to stay in the parent’s home and care for the parents, but Reeta’s new daughter-in-law did not want to live in the same house because of the smell, so the young couple moved out. Tej loves his mother dearly, and vowed not to marry in case his wife would be equally as unkind to his mother.

Two years ago, Tej and his mother went to India in search of treatment. One hospital offered surgery but required 100,000 Indian rupees in advance, which was far beyond their means. Reeta and her son sadly returned home. Thankfully, Reeta soon learned about a fistula repair clinic in Surkhet from a health worker at the local health post. She learned that treatment was free and travel costs would also be paid. So in February 2015, Reeta and Taj went to Surkhet. Reeta settled into the ward with about 40 other patients, and was thankful to know she was not alone.

A few days later, Reeta’s surgery was performed. After two weeks of recovery and anxious waiting, Reeta learned that her surgery was successful. She slept in a dry bed for the first time in 33 years, and she and Tej couldn’t be happier!

About Nepal

  • Population: 29,033,914
  • Average Births per Woman: 2.18
  • Female Literacy: 53.1%
  • Population Living in Poverty: 25.2% (less than $1.25/day)
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