Meet Ravony

For the last eight years, Ravony has suffered with obstetric fistula, which caused her to leak urine uncontrollably. Her fistula was the result of a five day labor that ended in the death of her child.

Ravony's Story

Two hours after surgery, Ravony was already looking forward to returning home. She couldn’t wait to be able to walk wherever she wanted and to visit with her friends.

For the last eight years, she has suffered with obstetric fistula, which caused her to leak urine uncontrollably. Her fistula was the result of a five day labor that ended in the death of her child.

Only her husband and her mother knew about her fistula, and Ravony worked hard to hide her condition. She prayed to God often, asking to be healed. She concealed the leaking urine by changing her underwear five times a day, depending on how much water she drank. She stopped going out with her friends. She stayed home, lying down most of the time. The leaking was so much worse when she stood up. She shared, “I felt I was not human.”

Time progressed, and three years after developing fistula, she and her husband welcomed a second child into their lives when she delivered a healthy baby, without complication. But her leaking continued.

One day, a year after her second child was borh, she heard an advertisement on the radio, promoting the availability of free obstetric fistula surgery at a hospital in Morondava run by SALFA, a Fistula Foundation partner. But the hospital was very far away. It would require 50km journey on foot or on a cart pulled by zebu (cow), followed by a six hour drive by 4×4 to reach help.

But she found a way to make the trip, and in October 2016, she received free surgery from SALFA in Morondava. On this day, two hours post-surgery, she is happy. “Before, I felt like I was in a prison in my own home. But, I have freedom now.”

About Madagascar

  • Population: 24,430,325
  • Average Births per Woman: 4.12
  • Female Literacy: 62.6%
  • Population Living in Poverty: 75.3% (less than $1.25/day)
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  • Marivelo

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    In May, 2013, Marivelo went in to labor with her first child. Her labor lasted for four days. The child did not survive, and Marivelo was left incontinent of urine. She had developed an obstetric fistula as a result of the prolonged, unrelieved labor.

  • Maho

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  • Justine

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  • Rasoandrana Marie Lucie

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    Gul

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    Gul lives in Afghanistan. At 13 years old, her father arranged for her to marry an older man who had another wife, and after one year of marriage, Gul became pregnant. When she went into labor, it lasted for two days. There were no clinics or doctors where she lived and Gul's husband became worried. He took her to her father's house, where Gul's father killed a sheep and placed the sheepskin on her as part of a traditional treatment used in her area. After three days of wearing the sheepskin, Gul delivered a stillborn baby.

  • Saran

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    After developing a fistula with the birth of her fourth child, Saran received free fistula surgery at our partner site Jean Paul II Hospital in Conakry, Guinea.

  • Bernard

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  • Fina

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  • Alphonsia

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  • Mwajuma

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  • Everlyn

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  • Beauty

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    Beauty developed a fistula five years ago after a very complicated delivery. She told doctors at St. Francis Mission Hospital that she prayed every day for a miracle, never knowing that her leaking was actually caused by a medical condition for which free treatment was available.

  • Rose

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    Rose developed a fistula after her very first pregnancy, and has been suffering because of it ever since. For over fifty years she struggled, never knowing that treatment was available....until recently when she met Sister Anna, the head nurse of Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Center's fistula ward in Moshi.

  • Grace

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  • Debora

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