Meet Rasoanirina

Rasoanirina was 18 when she went into labor with her first child. But her labor did not go as planned: it lasted for three excruciating days before the baby was delivered stillborn, via C-section on July 2, 2015. Her complicated labor left her with more than the pain of losing a child; it also left her with obstetric fistula.

Rasoanirina's Story

Unable to bear the smell of her incontinence, Rasoanirina’s husband left her. She was devastated, and grew withdrawn. She didn’t leave the house. She stopped seeing her friends. She used to be happy and full of jokes, but that stopped as her confidence waned. Her family told her not to worry, that one day they would find a doctor who could restore her health.

Then one day, they did. Her sister heard an advertisement on the radio about free help for women suffering from incontinence caused by childbirth. Rasoanirina decided to travel to Morondava to receive surgery from the doctors at SALFA, and her sister accompanied her on the journey.

Today, Rasoanirina is healed. She is healed and happy that she received help, and plans to tell everyone about SALFA and that the radio ad was true: surgery is free, and it can heal fistula.

About Madagascar

  • Population: 24,430,325
  • Average Births per Woman: 4.12
  • Female Literacy: 62.6%
  • Population Living in Poverty: 75.3% (less than $1.25/day)
Read More

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Read Another Woman’s Story

  • Francine

    Madagascar

    She became pregnant with her first child around age 17. Things did not go as planned, and Francine found herself in labor for three days. Finally, she was taken to a hospital where her baby was delivered via C-section. As a result of her prolonged obstructed labor, Francine had developed an obstetric fistula.

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    Despite the efforts of one dedicated doctor who rode over an hour by motorbike late in the evening to help save the life of Christine and her baby, the baby did not survive. Her prolonged labor also resulted in obstetric fistula. Her husband abandoned her because he could not stand the smell of her incontinence, but her brothers defied cultural tradition and insisted she and her five children live with them. Then, a radio advertisement changed her life.

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    Kenya

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  • Confidence from Liberia (WAHA)

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    Liberia

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    Naresia

    Kenya

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