Meet Queen

“When my husband saw the many health issues I had, he despised me, he called me names and always told me in the face that I was more than crippled.” She was left on her own and most of the time starving. She reached at a point that she could not withstand the mistreatment and she went back to her parents. After a few years her parents died. “I walk like a crippled woman, there is nothing that I own on this earth, I don’t have a husband, I don’t have a baby. My life is so empty.” She has said that her deepest desire has been to die a clean woman. But at Gynocare, where she received fistula surgery through the Action on Fistula program, she is happy. Here, she feels loved and valued. She knows she has a family at Gynocare.

Queen's Story

Queen was married off in 1971 at the age of 17 years. The man came to her parents to ask for her hand in marriage but she refused to marry him after she learned that she was going to be the third wife. The man came back to see her father in her absence and gave him money; when she returned, her father’s attitude toward her had changed completely to the extent of organizing with the man to forcefully carry her to his home.

She had a still birth for a first born. In 1974 she became pregnant; she labored at home for two days before being taken to a health facility. When she reached the facility, the baby was pulled out and again, she lost her baby. Two days after, she was unable to walk, leaking urine and at the same time passing stool. It took her two years to be able to walk again, although she still doesn’t walk very well.

“When my husband saw the many health issues I had, he despised me, he called me names and always told me in the face that I was more than crippled.” She was left on her own and most of the time starving. She reached at a point that she could not withstand the mistreatment and she went back to her parents. After a few years her parents died.

“I walk like a crippled woman, there is nothing that I own on this earth, I don’t have a husband, I don’t have a baby. My life is so empty.” She has said that her deepest desire has been to die a clean woman. But at Gynocare, where she received fistula surgery through the Action on Fistula program, she is happy. Here, she feels loved and valued. She knows she has a family at Gynocare.

About Kenya

  • Population: 45,010,056
  • Average Births per Woman: 3.54
  • Female Literacy: 84.2%
  • Population Living in Poverty: 43.4% (less than $1.25/day)
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