Meet Odeline

As is the norm in Chad, Odeline was married at the age of 23 and soon became pregnant. The pregnancy went well and she delivered a healthy baby boy. Three years later she also delivered her second baby girl without problems. In 2006, she became pregnant with her third child. She carried the baby for nine months and expected the labor to be normal as in her first two deliveries, but after having been in labor for more than two days it was obvious something was seriously wrong.

Odeline's Story

Without access to an ambulance or proper transportation, she had to travel on a carriage for 10 hours to the nearest hospital in Bebaloum. She had been in labor for three days when she arrived at the hospital in January 2013. Upon arrival she had to undergo a caesarean section to remove the stillborn child. Soon after the surgery, Odeline found that she was involuntarily leaking urine. Still recovering from her loss, she was diagnosed with vesico-vaginal fistula. Unable to attend to her normal chores at home and continuously leaking urine, her husband left her and she was forced to return to her family.

With determination, Odeline went back to Bebaloum Hospital in 2007 to seek help. That year she underwent an unsuccessful surgery and was not healed. Odeline’s spirit and hope was subdued and she decided to accept her fate and return home.

Finally she heard about the National Center for Reproductive Health and Fistula Repair in N’Djamena. Overwhelmed by the burden of her condition, she decided to seek help there. Odeline’s case was so complicated that it would need a skilful and experienced fistula specialist to operate on her. Odeline got an appointment with Dr. Nessy, an expert fistula surgeon working at the center. She recalls thinking: “This is my last chance. If Dr. Nessy, who helped others to find their health, does not heal me, it will be the end for me.”

Her final operation took place on October 30th 2013 and finally, after almost seven years of suffering, Odeline was healed. “I don’t know how to express my joy the day I recovered my health. I am grateful to God and all the medical team at the Center for Fistula Repair. I was so desperate because of the unsuccessful surgery I had gone through, but God is great. I will continue to pray to my God to give Dr. Nessy added strength and knowledge to help my friends who are not yet healed.”

About Chad

  • Population: 11,852,462
  • Average Births per Woman: 4.45
  • Female Literacy: 31.9%
  • Population Living in Poverty: 46.7% (less than $1.25/day)
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We’re Making a Difference in Chad

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Your Donations at Work: Chad

Your donations have supported fistula treatment in Chad since 2011, through the work of our partner Women and Health Alliance International (WAHA). Over the last two years, WAHA reports that they were able to provide life-changing surgery to 310 women—many of whom (40 percent) were suffering from complex injuries requiring an advanced level of surgical…

Care providers gather in the lobby of the Center for Reproductive Health and Fistula Repair in N'Djamena, Chad

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Expanding Access to Quality Treatment for Women in Chad

Women suffering from fistula in Chad will have access to a regional medical center which specializes in treating women with fistula, thanks to one woman’s very generous gift to The Fistula Foundation. Her donation will help The Center for Reproductive Health and Fistula Repair become a center of excellence with the capacity to treat even more women suffering from obstetric fistula. The…

Read Another Woman’s Story

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