Meet Nura

Nura comes from Lai, a region in the south of Chad where she married at age 17. She first became pregnant at 20 and tried to give birth at home, aided only by her family. After 4 days of complicated labor, she was finally taken to the maternity center in Guidari, a nearby village.

Nura's Story

Doctors at Guidari performed a C-section and Nura gave birth to a stillborn baby boy. Soon thereafter, she began leaking urine.

Nura did not know where she could be healed. For 25 years she was resigned to live with her condition, until 2013 when she learned about free surgeries at the Center for Reproductive Health and Fistula Repair in N’Djamena. During her first visit to the center, she was scheduled for a fistula repair surgery. Thanks to the skill and dedication of the surgical team at the center, Nura’s operation was successful and she was healed of her fistula.

Following her surgery, Nura said: “I am recovering now. And this feeling gives me an immense sense of peace. With the fistula I could not be at ease with the others, not even with my own family. Fortunately, my husband was always supportive and stayed at my side giving a good example. My intervention came out fine and I am better now.”

About Chad

  • Population: 11,852,462
  • Average Births per Woman: 4.45
  • Female Literacy: 31.9%
  • Population Living in Poverty: 46.7% (less than $1.25/day)
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We’re Making a Difference in Chad

News
Your Donations at Work: Chad

Your donations have supported fistula treatment in Chad since 2011, through the work of our partner Women and Health Alliance International (WAHA). Over the last two years, WAHA reports that they were able to provide life-changing surgery to 310 women—many of whom (40 percent) were suffering from complex injuries requiring an advanced level of surgical…

Care providers gather in the lobby of the Center for Reproductive Health and Fistula Repair in N'Djamena, Chad

News
Expanding Access to Quality Treatment for Women in Chad

Women suffering from fistula in Chad will have access to a regional medical center which specializes in treating women with fistula, thanks to one woman’s very generous gift to The Fistula Foundation. Her donation will help The Center for Reproductive Health and Fistula Repair become a center of excellence with the capacity to treat even more women suffering from obstetric fistula. The…

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