NIrmala-Nepal

Meet Nirmala

Nirmala is 25. She lives in Doti, in the far western region of Nepal. For many years, she lived in India, where her husband had found work. While living in India, she gave birth to her first child, a stillborn baby that was delivered after 24 hours of difficult labor that left Nirmala with a double fistula, in her bowels and bladder.

Nirmala's Story

Her husband took her to the best hospitals in India, where they spent all of the money they had on multiple complex operations, x-rays and doctor visits – none of which were able to heal Nirmala. Suffering through the misery of her double fistula, Nirmala and her husband learned of a fistula camp being run by Fistula Foundation’s grantee partner, International Nepal Fellowship (INL).

They may have had doubts about what they could expect from a set-up in a tent after the grand hospitals in India had failed, but they didn’t say so, and they had no money left,” reported a representative from INL.

Surgeons involved with the camp were able to successfully repair both of Nirmala’s fistulas, and she is now dry. She returned home cured and thinking about her future, that perhaps in a few years, she and her husband might be able to bring a baby into their home. (INL is hopeful for her and inspired, having learned this year of their first “fistula baby,” born to a patient healed in a 2010 fistula camp, who delivered safely by C-section.)

About Nepal

  • Population: 29,033,914
  • Average Births per Woman: 2.18
  • Female Literacy: 53.1%
  • Population Living in Poverty: 25.2% (less than $1.25/day)
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Read Another Woman’s Story

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    Umuhoza arrived at the hospital with two massive fistulas and could barely walk. She was so traumatized by her labor that she could not remember any details. Today she is healed, but the road to recovery has been long and difficult.

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  • Mildred

    Kenya

    Mildred developed fistula after prolonged, obstructed labor with her second child. She endured two difficult months of life with fistula before receiving treatment through our Action on Fistula program.

  • Nathi-Uganda

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    Nathi* lives in Uganda. She was married at the age of 13 and two years later was pregnant with her first child. After enduring a difficult labor, Nathi lost her baby and was left with obstetric fistula, incontinent and leaking wastes. Her husband abandoned her and soon after, her family did, too. At 15, she was alone and scared.

  • Jane

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  • Alphonsia

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  • Mayeye

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  • Halima

    Halima

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    Originally from Somalia and now living in Kenya, in the world’s largest refugee camp, Halima has been through a hell few can imagine. But after traveling over 1,000 miles seeking fistula treatment, she is finally healed.

  • Towanda

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  • Queen

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