Meet Nanyoor

Nanyoor experienced a terrible obstructed labor when she was only 16 years old. She is a member of the Maasai tribe in northern Tanzania, and her remote community is miles away from any major healthcare facility.

Nanyoor's Story

When Nanyoor’s labor continued into a third day, her family took her to the nearest town on foot. The doctors there were unable to help her. They sent her to a major hospital in the city of Karatu, over 30 miles away. It was the first time Nanyoor had ever been inside a hospital. When she arrived, she immediately had a Caesarean section, but tragically, her baby did not survive.

Nanyoor began recovering at the hospital in Karatu, and noticed that she was leaking urine. She assumed that it was normal after such a grueling labor, but when the incontinence continued for a second week, she alerted her doctors. They diagnosed her with obstetric fistula.

Nanyoor was devastated. She kept her condition a secret, and only shared her suffering with her mother. “I wanted to keep the problem confidential,” she shared. She was ashamed of her leaking and the constant smell of urine.

Thankfully, Nanyoor did not have to suffer for long. The hospital in Karatu referred her to a Fistula Foundation partner hospital for life-changing treatment. They arranged for Nanyoor to travel by motorbike, and then bus—all of her travel expenses were covered. Once she arrived at the hospital, she underwent successful fistula repair surgery.

Today, Nanyoor is completely dry and recovering at home in her Maasai community. She recognizes that her story could have been completely different if it were not for the generosity of donors like you. “If I hadn’t been treated, it would be a big problem,” she said.

Thanks to your compassion, Nanyoor will never have to face that terrible reality. Instead, she looks ahead to her future with optimism.

About Tanzania

  • Population: 49,639,138
  • Average Births per Woman: 4.95
  • Female Literacy: 60.8%
  • Population Living in Poverty: 67.9% (less than $1.25/day)
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