Meet Mary

Mary's first two pregnancies progressed normally, giving her two healthy children. But she never could have imagined what would happen when it came time to deliver her third child.

Mary's Story

“Fistula is most dehumanizing condition that I have ever known. I stayed home because whenever I would go to where people are, they would just hold their noses and start leaving one by one, and eventually I would be left alone. One year with fistula has robbed me of so many things that I spent very time building including: self- esteem, marriage and relationships.”

Mary was the mother of two healthy children, but her third pregnancy did not progress as planned. She attempted to deliver the child at home, as she had with her other children, but after 24 hours of labor, her pain subsided. Mary decided that she would use the break in pain to do a thorough cleaning, as she did not feel she had prepared enough for the baby’s arrival.

“I assumed that the pains I experienced were false labor. I decided to utilize the time the pain had gone down to prepare a bit,” said Mary. She waited for four days for the labor pains to return when she began to notice strange things in her urine. She told her husband what she saw, and he recommended that she seek medical help. This is when Mary learned that her baby had died, days ago. The stillborn child was delivered by Cesarean section. Not long after, Mary began to leak urine.

Luckily for Mary, the doctors at the hospital where she was treated were familiar with her condition, and informed her that she had developed an obstetric fistula.

“I could have been treated almost immediately,” Mary explained, “but due to my health, which had badly deteriorated, I was advised to wait a few months before going in for another surgery.”

Mary will wait for her body to heal before receiving a free fistula surgery at the Kisii Gynocare Fistula Center, provided through Fistula Foundation’s Action on Fistula program. But, she considers herself lucky. “I don’t know what could have become of me if I had Iived with fistula like other women, who lived with fistula for decades.”

About Kenya

  • Population: 45,010,056
  • Average Births per Woman: 3.54
  • Female Literacy: 84.2%
  • Population Living in Poverty: 43.4% (less than $1.25/day)
Read More

We’re Making a Difference in Kenya

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Partner Spotlight – WADADIA

Supporters like you have changed thousands of lives through our Action on Fistula program in Kenya. Community outreach is critical to the project’s overall success. In fact, over 80 percent of patients are referred to Action on Fistula directly through outreach efforts. That’s why we are overflowing with gratitude for our outreach partners at WADADIA…

News
Field Notes – I Held Her Hand

By: Katie Weller, Marketing Communications Writer, Fistula Foundation “Sit down, let’s talk to her,” said Joyce, nodding. She gestured to the hospital bed with a smile and a psychologist’s certainty. We were now alone in a hospital room at Jamaa Mission Hospital—one of six facilities in the Action on Fistula program. From my comfortable desk…

Read Another Woman’s Story

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    Nathi

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