Meet Marivelo

In May, 2013, Marivelo went in to labor with her first child. Her labor lasted for four days. The child did not survive, and Marivelo was left incontinent of urine. She had developed an obstetric fistula as a result of the prolonged, unrelieved labor.

Marivelo's Story

Her doctors told her that no one could help. Unable to tolerate the smell of her incontinence, her husband left.

For the first year, Marivelo did not leave her home, and no one visited her. Not long after she decided to finally venture out of her home, Marivelo’s friends noticed her wet clothes. She was forced to tell them the truth, that she had been leaking uncontrollably for the last year.

But: this turned out to be a very positive revelation. She feared that she would be shunned, but in fact, quite the opposite happened. As word spread through Marivelo’s village, her community banded together to help her, even pooling enough money together to help her pay for a doctor.

When she heard a radio advertisement about surgeries being provided by to women suffering from the same symptoms she had, she made preparations to travel to Morondava to access free treatment from SALFA, a Fistula Foundation partner.

In October, 2016, she received surgery that restored her health, and gave her a second chance at life. She plans to “dance the whole way home” from the hospital, and have a big party to celebrate with her family.

And what of her estranged husband? No bother. She’s going to find a new one.

About Madagascar

  • Population: 24,430,325
  • Average Births per Woman: 4.12
  • Female Literacy: 62.6%
  • Population Living in Poverty: 75.3% (less than $1.25/day)
Read More

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Obstetric fistula happens most frequently in rural areas, where emergency medical care is not easily accessible. A woman’s risk of developing fistula is also exacerbated by cultural misunderstanding about doctors and surgery. Madagascar faces both of these challenges: its infrastructure is poor, which can make travel to the hospital complicated and dangerous. Also, there is…

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Fistula Foundation’s work in Madagascar wouldn’t be the same without the amazing support of our partner, Icon. Read their Giveback recap blog post below, and the stories of women at SALFA, our partner in Madagascar: How You Changed These Women’s Lives 12/19/17 written by Natalie Pattillo How You Changed These Women’s Lives As a women-led…

Read Another Woman’s Story

  • Tovisoa

    Madagascar

    Tovisoa is hopeful as she waits for fistula surgery that could change her life.

  • Christine

    Kenya

    Despite the efforts of one dedicated doctor who rode over an hour by motorbike late in the evening to help save the life of Christine and her baby, the baby did not survive. Her prolonged labor also resulted in obstetric fistula. Her husband abandoned her because he could not stand the smell of her incontinence, but her brothers defied cultural tradition and insisted she and her five children live with them. Then, a radio advertisement changed her life.

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  • Mary

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  • Elizabeth

    Madagascar

    Elizabeth is mother to ten children. For nearly a year, she suffered in shame, uncontrollably leaking urine. A doctor misdiagnosed her condition as a urinary tract infection. Without a way to stop the incontinence, Elizabeth went to great lengths to hide her injury.

  • Elvanah

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    Elvanah gave birth to her first child at the age of 17. Her labor became obstructed, and ultimately was delivered via C-section. Her prolonged obstructed labor had resulted in an obstetric fistula.

  • Annonciata

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    Annonciata is a 56-year old mother and farmer from a small village in Budaka District in Uganda. She had previously given birth to six children without significant complications, but her seventh delivery did not go as planned.

  • Zeinabou

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  • Rahima

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  • Alphonsia

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  • Faith C.

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  • Kemzo

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  • Aneni

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    Before finding treatment through Fistula Foundation, Aneni* suffered with a terrible fistula for 35 years.

  • Christine A.

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  • Sujata

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    Sujata lives in Bajura, a very poor and remote mountain district in western Nepal. She lives with her husband, whom she married when she was 16 years old, and his family in a small house shared by 12 people. One year after their wedding, Sujata was looking forward to the birth of her first child. There was no health facility nearby, so when Sujata’s labor entered its eighth day, the family called on the local birth attendant.

  • Jahanara

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    Jahanara is just 23 years old. She was in labor for a full day at home before going to a hospital for an emergency C-section. By then, unfortunately, the damage had already been done.

  • Nathi-Uganda

    Nathi

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    Nathi* lives in Uganda. She was married at the age of 13 and two years later was pregnant with her first child. After enduring a difficult labor, Nathi lost her baby and was left with obstetric fistula, incontinent and leaking wastes. Her husband abandoned her and soon after, her family did, too. At 15, she was alone and scared.

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