Meet Marivelo

In May, 2013, Marivelo went in to labor with her first child. Her labor lasted for four days. The child did not survive, and Marivelo was left incontinent of urine. She had developed an obstetric fistula as a result of the prolonged, unrelieved labor.

Marivelo's Story

Her doctors told her that no one could help. Unable to tolerate the smell of her incontinence, her husband left.

For the first year, Marivelo did not leave her home, and no one visited her. Not long after she decided to finally venture out of her home, Marivelo’s friends noticed her wet clothes. She was forced to tell them the truth, that she had been leaking uncontrollably for the last year.

But: this turned out to be a very positive revelation. She feared that she would be shunned, but in fact, quite the opposite happened. As word spread through Marivelo’s village, her community banded together to help her, even pooling enough money together to help her pay for a doctor.

When she heard a radio advertisement about surgeries being provided by to women suffering from the same symptoms she had, she made preparations to travel to Morondava to access free treatment from SALFA, a Fistula Foundation partner.

In October, 2016, she received surgery that restored her health, and gave her a second chance at life. She plans to “dance the whole way home” from the hospital, and have a big party to celebrate with her family.

And what of her estranged husband? No bother. She’s going to find a new one.

About Madagascar

  • Population: 24,430,325
  • Average Births per Woman: 4.12
  • Female Literacy: 62.6%
  • Population Living in Poverty: 75.3% (less than $1.25/day)
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Obstetric fistula happens most frequently in rural areas, where emergency medical care is not easily accessible. A woman’s risk of developing fistula is also exacerbated by cultural misunderstanding about doctors and surgery. Madagascar faces both of these challenges: its infrastructure is poor, which can make travel to the hospital complicated and dangerous. Also, there is…

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Fistula Foundation’s work in Madagascar wouldn’t be the same without the amazing support of our partner, Icon. Read their Giveback recap blog post below, and the stories of women at SALFA, our partner in Madagascar: How You Changed These Women’s Lives 12/19/17 written by Natalie Pattillo How You Changed These Women’s Lives As a women-led…

Read Another Woman’s Story

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    Mwajuma developed a fistula while in labor with her seventh child. Thankfully, it wasn’t long before she met Mariam, who helped her get free treatment through our Action on Fistula program in Kenya. With her health restored, Mwajuma now has plans to start a new business so she can help support her family.

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  • Florinda

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  • Salha

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    Nathi* lives in Uganda. She was married at the age of 13 and two years later was pregnant with her first child. After enduring a difficult labor, Nathi lost her baby and was left with obstetric fistula, incontinent and leaking wastes. Her husband abandoned her and soon after, her family did, too. At 15, she was alone and scared.

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