Meet Lucie

With a tube down her nose to her stomach, Lucie was unable to talk. Her sister, Elysa, relayed this story on her behalf.

Lucie's Story

With a tube down her nose to her stomach, Lucie was unable to talk. Her sister, Elysa, relayed this story on her behalf.

On February 25, 2009, Lucie went in to labor. On the third day she passed out from exhaustion, and on the fourth day, her lifeless baby was delivered by C-section. For the next three months, she was hospitalized. In and out of hospitals for the next several months, her doctors finally told her there was no more they could do to ease her suffering; she needed to go to Antananarivo, the capital city, to find help. But her family had already sold all three of their cows and there was no more money to pay hospital fees. For the next seven years, she was in immense pain, lying down for five or six days at a time to gain the strength to walk for two or three.

In 2014, she gave birth again, this time developing an obstetric fistula in the process. Her baby survived, but died one month after birth. Her husband decided to leave.

Lucie’s personality changed completely. Prior to losing her child and developing fistula, she was talkative and had many friends. But after the fistula, she became incredibly shy and withdrawn. The village found out about her condition. She tried to take her own life on several occasions.

One day, Lucie and her family learned about SALFA. A Catholic nun told them about a local doctor spreading the word about free fistula treatment available in Morondava, through SALFA. She was overjoyed: this was the first time in years that she was told she could be healed.

With her sister at her side, Lucie finally received the help she had been waiting for for years. SALFA was able to heal her fistula, and they were able to remove a bladder stone the size of two golf balls – the source of her pain for so long.

She is worried about how she will pay for the bladder stone removal, which will cost roughly $80 USD, but grateful for her restored health and new chance at life.

About Madagascar

  • Population: 24,430,325
  • Average Births per Woman: 4.12
  • Female Literacy: 62.6%
  • Population Living in Poverty: 75.3% (less than $1.25/day)
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We’re Making a Difference in Madagascar

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Your Donations at Work – Madagascar

Obstetric fistula happens most frequently in rural areas, where emergency medical care is not easily accessible. A woman’s risk of developing fistula is also exacerbated by cultural misunderstanding about doctors and surgery. Madagascar faces both of these challenges: its infrastructure is poor, which can make travel to the hospital complicated and dangerous. Also, there is…

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Icon: How You Changed These Women’s Lives

Fistula Foundation’s work in Madagascar wouldn’t be the same without the amazing support of our partner, Icon. Read their Giveback recap blog post below, and the stories of women at SALFA, our partner in Madagascar: How You Changed These Women’s Lives 12/19/17 written by Natalie Pattillo How You Changed These Women’s Lives As a women-led…

Read Another Woman’s Story

  • Jahanara

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    Jahanara is just 23 years old. She was in labor for a full day at home before going to a hospital for an emergency C-section. By then, unfortunately, the damage had already been done.

  • Fanny

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    Fanny became pregnant by her boyfriend at 15. She was in labor for over 3 days, seeking medical care. Her family had to row a canoe for 6 hours to reach a hospital before Fanny finally delivered her baby through cesarean section. Fanny developed an obstetric fistula due to this ordeal, but her mother Dorcas was determined to find help for her daughter so that she could live a good life.

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    In obstructed labor with her sixth child, Celestine was rushed to her local health facility, only to be told she couldn’t have emergency surgery until her family made a down payment. Anxious and afraid, she waited for her husband to return with the money needed.

  • Naomi

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  • Merin’y

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    Merin'y is the mother of three healthy children, but when the time came to deliver her fourth child, things did not go as they had before. Her labor was long and intense, and resulted in an obstetric fistula.

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    Sofia

    Liberia

    At 16, Sofia lost her baby boy in childbirth and developed a fistula, prompting her husband to leave her. Unaware what her condition was called or that treatment was possible, she became almost completely isolated over the next three years, giving up hope of ever being healed. A radio ad changed her life.

  • Mary

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    Mary, from rural West Pokot, Kenya, received free fistula repair surgery in 2015 after being referred for treatment by a community health worker. With a bright future ahead, she wishes to become a fistula ambassador herself.

  • Ravony

    Madagascar

    For the last eight years, Ravony has suffered with obstetric fistula, which caused her to leak urine uncontrollably. Her fistula was the result of a five day labor that ended in the death of her child.

  • Seline

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  • Sokhina

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    Sokhina endured four days of excruciating labor before delivering a stillborn baby. But her nightmare was just beginning: soon after she began to leak urine and learned that she had an obstetric fistula. She suffered with this injury for eight years before learning that help was available.

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  • Felana

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  • Annonciata

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  • Alitash

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    Alitash is 56 years old and lives in a small village about 50 kilometers east of Aira, a large town in western Ethiopia. She has given birth three times – her first two children died as teenagers, and the third was stillborn.

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    Pregnant at 14, Annet Jane suffered with a fistula for 23 years before receiving treatment. Now, she has hope for the future.

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    Nura comes from Lai, a region in the south of Chad where she married at age 17. She first became pregnant at 20 and tried to give birth at home, aided only by her family. After 4 days of complicated labor, she was finally taken to the maternity center in Guidari, a nearby village.

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