Meet Lida

Lida gave birth to her first and only child 12 years ago. Sadly, the baby died shortly after it was born. Not only that, but Lida developed a fistula during the difficult delivery and started leaking urine constantly from that day.

Lida's Story

Her husband married a second wife, who gave birth to several children over the next few years. Lida was allowed to remain in the household, but she felt lonely and useless. When she first heard about free treatment at CURE Hospital in Kabul a few years ago, she did not yet allow herself to hope because she knew her husband would never agree to take her to Kabul. Their village was on the opposite side of the country and transportation was expensive; plus, she told herself, her husband and his second wife no longer needed her.

Luckily, a caring aunt and nephew helped Lida get to Kabul. She arrived at CURE Hospital and was overwhelmed to find dozens of other women suffering from the same condition. That, along with the kindness of hospital staff, brought her to tears, and doctors report that she continued to cry tears of joy for several days.

After being evaluated and officially diagnosed with fistula, Lida underwent a successful repair surgery and woke up dry for the first time in 12 years. Overjoyed, she left the hospital full of hope for the future.

About Afghanistan

  • Population: 33,332,025
  • Average Births per Woman: 5.22
  • Female Literacy: 24.2%
  • Population Living in Poverty: 36% (less than $1.25/day)
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We’re Making a Difference in Afghanistan

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Women Helping Women in Afghanistan: CURE International Hospital [2:02]

Against a backdrop of continuing violence and oppression of women in Afghanistan, a heroic team of all-female surgeons are doing the nearly impossible: delivering life-changing fistula surgeries to women in need. Fistula Foundation has pledged $200,000 to help our hospital partner, CURE International. A generous donor will MATCH the first $20,000 in gifts to support…

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Your Donations at Work – Afghanistan

Delivering a baby in Afghanistan can be a life or death event. Every thirty minutes, another Afghan woman dies during childbirth—the country holds one of the highest maternal mortality rates in the world. For every woman who dies, it is estimated that 20 more survive with significant childbirth injuries, including obstetric fistula. There is also…

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    Kaudha is from eastern Uganda. At age 27, she developed a fistula after spending hours in labor with her third child. Unfortunately, the baby did not survive, and Kaudha’s condition left her feeling isolated from friends and loved ones. But in fall 2015, her story—and her outlook—changed dramatically.

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    Gul lives in Afghanistan. At 13 years old, her father arranged for her to marry an older man who had another wife, and after one year of marriage, Gul became pregnant. When she went into labor, it lasted for two days. There were no clinics or doctors where she lived and Gul's husband became worried. He took her to her father's house, where Gul's father killed a sheep and placed the sheepskin on her as part of a traditional treatment used in her area. After three days of wearing the sheepskin, Gul delivered a stillborn baby.

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    Nirmala is 25. She lives in Doti, in the far western region of Nepal. For many years, she lived in India, where her husband had found work. While living in India, she gave birth to her first child, a stillborn baby that was delivered after 24 hours of difficult labor that left Nirmala with a double fistula, in her bowels and bladder.

  • Fina

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  • Rose

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    Rose developed a fistula after her very first pregnancy, and has been suffering because of it ever since. For over fifty years she struggled, never knowing that treatment was available....until recently when she met Sister Anna, the head nurse of Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Center's fistula ward in Moshi.

  • Fatma

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