Meet Levine

Levine never imagined that appendicitis surgery would result in an injury that could devastate her life.

Levine's Story

In 2015, she was admitted to the hospital for routine appendicitis surgery. During the procedure, her surgeon accidentally punctured her bladder, which resulted in an iatrogenic fistula.

She was discharged from the hospital, but her doctors left in a catheter. Every 20 days, for 17 months, she returned to the hospital to change the bag that held her urine. In addition to the incontinence, she began to have headaches and stomachaches. The doctors would only prescribe drugs.

Levine said she grew shy, embarrassed by her leaking urine. Yet she was grateful that her husband, her four children, friends and extended family all remained supportive emotionally and financially.

One day, she learned of the SALFA hospital in Morondava, and that they could provide treatment that would heal her fistula, thanks to support from Fistula Foundation. She received treatment in July, 2016, and doctors reported that her surgery was successful. She returned to the hospital in October for a follow up appointment.

Sadly, the road to full recovery still lies ahead of Levine. During her follow up appointment, she shared that she still did not feel well. Her wound had grown severe and infected, making it difficult for her to sit up in bed.

But one day, her health will be restored and this nightmare will become a distant memory.

About Madagascar

  • Population: 24,430,325
  • Average Births per Woman: 4.12
  • Female Literacy: 62.6%
  • Population Living in Poverty: 75.3% (less than $1.25/day)
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