Action on Fistula - Jane

Meet Jane and Elizabeth

After suffering five miscarriages, Jane prepared to deliver her first child. But two days of difficult labor left Jane with an obstetric fistula. At home, she became traumatized by isolation and mistreatment from her husband, who had taken another wife. Her sister, Elizabeth, stepped in.

Jane and Elizabeth's Story

In 1999, after suffering five miscarriages, Jane prepared to deliver her first child. But two days of difficult labor assisted only by a mother-in-law who had no medical skills left Jane with an obstetric fistula. Her baby boy survived, but the trauma of delivery took a serious toll on his developmental health.

At home, Jane became traumatized by isolation and mistreatment from her husband, who had taken another wife. Her sister, Elizabeth, stepped in.

“After seeing what Jane went through at her home, I decided to take her in to mine,” said Elizabeth. “The love for my sister was paramount and I wanted to give her all the best I could.”

Elizabeth’s husband and children were supportive of Jane joining their household, but there were other challenges. “When I took her in, I was already taking care of seven other children. Four of these were orphans left behind by my elder daughter who passed on together with her husband through HIV related illness. This was my biggest challenges when adding one more dependent who required close attention with my limited resources from our farm,” Elizabeth shared, tearfully.

Last year, Jane was visited by an outreach worker affiliated with Fistula Foundation’s Action on Fistula program, who shared information about fistula treatment. Jane was soon screened and referred for treatment.

“I was very overjoyed and thanked God and the doctors in whose hands He worked miracles to save my sister, in a way I never expected,” said Elizabeth.

Today, Jane is healed of fistula and remains warmly received by Elizabeth’s family.

“The most important thing is to show love and care to a sister who is a fistula survivor,” said Elizabeth, adding, “This will mean a lot to her.”

About Kenya

  • Population: 45,010,056
  • Average Births per Woman: 3.54
  • Female Literacy: 84.2%
  • Population Living in Poverty: 43.4% (less than $1.25/day)
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We’re Making a Difference in Kenya

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Daily Nation: An estimated 3,000 obstetric fistula cases are reported annually, but only a third receive treatment due to lack of specialists

Fistula Foundation Senior Program Director Lindsey Pollaczek and Outreach Manager Habiba Corodhia Mohamed are interviewed for a story about the success of our Action on Fistula program in Kenya, which combines extensive community outreach with surgeon training to find and treat more women suffering from fistula. Lack of specialists hinders treatment of fistula cases An estimated…

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Reuters: As surgeries triple, Kenya aims to end shame of fistula

Reuters reports on Kenya’s aim to end the shame of obstetric fistula nationwide, tripling treatment surgeries and increasing capacity through opening treatment centers and training surgeons. Read the full article at the link below: As surgeries triple, Kenya aims to end shame of fistula NAIROBI (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – Kenya’s hopes of ending incontinence caused…

Read Another Woman’s Story

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  • Nathi-Uganda

    Nathi

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    Nathi* lives in Uganda. She was married at the age of 13 and two years later was pregnant with her first child. After enduring a difficult labor, Nathi lost her baby and was left with obstetric fistula, incontinent and leaking wastes. Her husband abandoned her and soon after, her family did, too. At 15, she was alone and scared.

  • Bilkis

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    Bilkis is just 20 years old. She developed an obstetric fistula during the delivery of her first baby. Bilkis delivered under the guidance of a traditional birth attendant who encouraged her to continue her labor at home despite the fact that she had already been in labor for two days.

  • Seline

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    Seline lives in a small village in the remote region of West Pokot, Kenya. She did not go to school and married young, as is tradition in this pastoralist community. She went into labor with her fourth child about three years ago, preferring to give birth at home with a traditional birth attendant from her village. Only 18% of women give birth in a health center in this region of Kenya, far below the national average of 44%

  • Nura

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    Nura comes from Lai, a region in the south of Chad where she married at age 17. She first became pregnant at 20 and tried to give birth at home, aided only by her family. After 4 days of complicated labor, she was finally taken to the maternity center in Guidari, a nearby village.

  • Chepotyeltyel

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    Chepotyeltyel is a Pokot woman from a remote, rural area in northwestern Kenya. After suffering with fistula for nearly 50 years, she was finally able to receive free fistula treatment in July 2016.

  • Betty

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  • Alphonsia

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    Nazneen

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  • Pushpa

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    Pushpa is approximately 50 years old and from a remote village in western Nepal. When she arrived at Kathmandu Model Hospital, she was leaking urine and feces uncontrollably and was severely depressed.

  • Esther

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    Esther gave birth to her second child, Manuel, less than one year ago. She was encouraged to stay at home to deliver the baby, where she labored for three days with the help of a traditional birth attendant. Fortunately, she gave birth to a lively baby boy. However, after four days she noticed she was leaking urine and was unable to control it.

  • Kaudha

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