Meet Jahanara

Jahanara is just 23 years old. She was in labor for a full day at home before going to a hospital for an emergency C-section. By then, unfortunately, the damage had already been done.

Jahanara's Story

By the time Jahanara got a C-section, her baby had died. A few days after leaving the hospital, she began leaking urine. Thankfully, after only seven months someone from the district hospital in Cox’s Bazar told her about fistula and the availability of free treatment at HOPE Hospital. This health care worker contacted the supervisor at HOPE Hospital, who in turn contacted Jahanara and arranged for her immediate transport to the hospital.

The team at HOPE Hospital operated on Jahanara and was able to successfully repair her fistula. She has now returned home with her husband and the young couple is looking forward to the future. Jahanara is a wonderful example of the power of community outreach, which increases awareness about fistula and helps women access treatment in a timely manner.

About Bangladesh

  • Population: 168,957,745
  • Average Births per Woman: 2.45
  • Female Literacy: 58.5%
  • Population Living in Poverty: 43.3% (less than $1.25/day)
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We’re Making a Difference in Bangladesh

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HOPE in Bangladesh

Since 2010, Fistula Foundation has been proud to partner with HOPE Foundation for Women and Children. Their bustling hospital is located in Cox’s Bazar, a small city near the border with Myanmar. HOPE is a lifeline to impoverished women in the area—and to the recent influx of Rohingya refugees, fleeing intense persecution in Myanmar. Check…

Read Another Woman’s Story

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    She became pregnant with her first child around age 17. Things did not go as planned, and Francine found herself in labor for three days. Finally, she was taken to a hospital where her baby was delivered via C-section. As a result of her prolonged obstructed labor, Francine had developed an obstetric fistula.

  • Jacqueline

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    During her first pregnancy in 2008, Jacqueline was in labor for a day before she was taken to Muyombe Clinic and then on to Isoka District Hospital. Her baby was removed using forceps and the baby was still born. Then she began to leak feces and urine.

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  • Mayeye

    Democratic Republic of Congo

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  • Fistula Foundation - Lia

    Lia

    Angola

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  • Margaret and Rose

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  • Mwajuma

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  • Hamida-Bangladesh

    Hamida

    Bangladesh

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    Kenya

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  • Rasoanandrasana

    Madagascar

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  • Kabuli, from Afghanistan (photo credit: CURE International)

    Kabuli

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    Kenya

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    Kenya

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  • Doris

    Zambia

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