Jahanara-web version

Meet Jahanara

Jahanara is just 23 years old. She was in labor for a full day at home before going to a hospital for an emergency C-section. By then, unfortunately, the damage had already been done.

Jahanara's Story

By the time Jahanara got a C-section, her baby had died. A few days after leaving the hospital, she began leaking urine. Thankfully, after only seven months someone from the district hospital in Cox’s Bazar told her about fistula and the availability of free treatment at HOPE Hospital. This health care worker contacted the supervisor at HOPE Hospital, who in turn contacted Jahanara and arranged for her immediate transport to the hospital.

The team at HOPE Hospital operated on Jahanara and was able to successfully repair her fistula. She has now returned home with her husband and the young couple is looking forward to the future. Jahanara is a wonderful example of the power of community outreach, which increases awareness about fistula and helps women access treatment in a timely manner.

About Bangladesh

  • Population: 168,957,745
  • Average Births per Woman: 2.45
  • Female Literacy: 58.5%
  • Population Living in Poverty: 43.3% (less than $1.25/day)
Read More

We’re Making a Difference in Bangladesh

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Hope Hospital – A Lighthouse for Fistula Patients in Remote Bangladesh

Fistula Foundation is proud to support the work of our partners at the Hope Foundation for Women & Children of Bangladesh. By Dr. Tareq Salahuddin Cox’s Bazar Women and Children’s Hospital — a project of Hope Foundation serves the people living in remotest area of Bangladesh. In some specialised services like fistula operation, they provide…

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The Face of HOPE

Meet Dr. Iftikher Mahmood, founder of the HOPE Foundation for Women & Children of Bangladesh. We have proudly funded his work since 2010; his hospital is the only facility in southern Bangladesh providing fistula treatment. Watch our interview with him to learn more about our partnership and his life-changing work.

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