Meet Grace

Grace got married in 1994, and explained that she immediately felt a burden upon herself to give birth to as many children as possible as quickly as possible in order to earn respect and stability in her marriage. This, she said, is the status quo in the rural African context.

Grace's Story

Grace became pregnant three months after her wedding, and delivered a healthy baby at home with the help of a traditional birth attendant. She went on to deliver two more babies at home, and became pregnant with her fourth child in 2006. “By this time, I had become a champion of home delivery and was sure that all I needed was a few minutes to deliver my fourth baby,” Grace said. When she went into labor, the traditional birth attendant came as usual but this time there was a problem: Grace’s labor was obstructed. The attendant was finally able to pull the baby out, but Grace nearly died during the process from excessive bleeding. It was only a few days later that she noticed she was leaking urine. Thankful to be alive, she assumed the leaking would stop and everything would go back to normal in a few weeks.

The leaking did not stop, however, and Grace’s life hasn’t been the same since. Her husband would beat her, sex became very painful, and she had to wash herself every few minutes of every day. She began to live a life of isolation, avoiding all social gatherings and occasions.

One evening, Grace was in her kitchen cooking supper when she heard a radio announcement about fistula and free surgical repair. Overjoyed, she took the initiative to find out more at a local health outpost, where staff connected her with Daraja Mbili Vision Volunteers. This group is part of our Action on Fistula program in Kenya and runs an outreach project. Through Daraja Mbili, Grace was able to access free surgery at Gynocare and is finally healed.

When asked about her journey, Grace said, “I am very happy that the Daraja Mbili outreach program has ensured that the information about fistula treatment has reached the very remote parts of Kenya; were it not for them, I would be still living with fistula.”

About Kenya

  • Population: 45,010,056
  • Average Births per Woman: 3.54
  • Female Literacy: 84.2%
  • Population Living in Poverty: 43.4% (less than $1.25/day)
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