Goni-Ethiopia

Meet Goni

Goni is fifteen years old and lives in a small village in the hills of northeastern Ethiopia. She married and became pregnant. During labor she developed a fistula; her husband abandoned her after the injury became apparent.

Goni's Story

 
Fortunately, Goni’s mother took her to receive treatment at the Teaching Hospital in Gondar on the first day it was open. This treatment center was funded by Fistula Foundation and WAHA to help women like Goni. Its medical director, Dr. Mulu Muleta, is one of the most accomplished fistula surgeons in the world. Today, Goni is dry and is back in her home town in the mountainous Tigray region of Ethiopia.

About Ethiopia

  • Population: 102,374,044
  • Average Births per Woman: 5.07
  • Female Literacy: 41.1%
  • Population Living in Poverty: 29.6% (less than $1.25/day)
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We’re Making a Difference in Ethiopia

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