Meet Fatma

When 18 year-old Fatma became pregnant, she did not have early and quality access to the healthcare she wanted when she gave birth. Fatma developed a fistula as a result of prolonged labor.

Fatma's Story

Fatma was in pain for almost two days without being taken to the hospital because her father was not home and her mother had no way to transport her to the district hospital, which was 84km away from their village. When they finally arrived at the district hospital, Fatma had surgery. Tragically, her baby had already died. A few days later, Fatma realized she was leaking feces. She was worried, but the doctor told her not to worry because the condition was curable. He gave her medicine and she was released and told to return to the hospital when the wound site had healed for referral to CCBRT’s Disability Hospital in Dar es Salaam.

“I went back home, but I lived a very difficult time with this condition for the past six months. I lost almost all of my friends including my boyfriend, who was responsible for my pregnancy. He left me when I needed him most, but good people took care of me thanks to my parents, CCBRT’S doctors, nurses and everybody who contributed to restore my dignity.”

Fatma was at CCBRT for one month. During her time there, she received everything necessary for her treatment and to make her stay comfortable. She is now recovered and has been discharged.

About Tanzania

  • Population: 49,639,138
  • Average Births per Woman: 4.95
  • Female Literacy: 60.8%
  • Population Living in Poverty: 67.9% (less than $1.25/day)
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