Meet Esther

Esther gave birth to her second child, Manuel, less than one year ago. She was encouraged to stay at home to deliver the baby, where she labored for three days with the help of a traditional birth attendant. Fortunately, she gave birth to a lively baby boy. However, after four days she noticed she was leaking urine and was unable to control it.

Esther's Story

Esther lives far from any health facility, but when a mobile clinic came to her village she sought assistance for the condition. She was told by the nurse that she couldn’t be helped, but gave her a few tablets of medicine just in case. Of course, the urine continued leaking.

Her husband decided that he couldn’t tolerate the smell of Esther in the house, so he left her and went away to Uganda with their cattle. Her in-laws asked her to leave the house and so she was forced to return home with her mother.

Esther’s mother, however, had previously met Jen, a Community Health Volunteer with the outreach organization WADADIA. Jen went from house to house telling people about a condition called fistula. At the time, Esther’s mother did not realize that her daughter had this condition, but as soon as she returned home she thought of Jen and was able to make the connection.

Esther says she was treated very well at Cherangany Nursing Home where she received her fistula repair surgery. She was so relieved to be dry when she left the facility, and when she reached her community she rushed to find Jen to inform her of the good news and thank her for the help she provided. She is feeling good, and as soon as the news spread her husband came right back to pick her up from her parent’s home. She is now back with her husband and two children and is feeling healthy and happy.

About Kenya

  • Population: 45,010,056
  • Average Births per Woman: 3.54
  • Female Literacy: 84.2%
  • Population Living in Poverty: 43.4% (less than $1.25/day)
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