Meet Elvanah

Elvanah gave birth to her first child at the age of 17. Her labor became obstructed, and ultimately was delivered via C-section. Her prolonged obstructed labor had resulted in an obstetric fistula.

Elvanah's Story

Elvanah is from Ambatolahy Village, about 250km from the nearest city, Morondava. She gave birth to her first child at the age of 17, in January 2017. Her labor became obstructed during delivery and ultimately was delivered via C-section. The child did not survive.

After her C-section, she realized that she could not hold her urine. Her prolonged obstructed labor had resulted in an obstetric fistula.

One day, she came across a poster with information related to obstetric fistula and reparative surgery available through SALFA. She promptly decided to seek treatment, and was admitted to SALFA’s fistula treatment program in Morondava.

She visited the hospital at Morondava months after her successful surgery because she heard that Fistula Foundation representatives would be visiting. She wanted to say hello and thank you in person. Today, she is happy and hopeful about her future.

About Madagascar

  • Population: 24,430,325
  • Average Births per Woman: 4.12
  • Female Literacy: 62.6%
  • Population Living in Poverty: 75.3% (less than $1.25/day)
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