Meet Elizabeth

Elizabeth is mother to ten children. For nearly a year, she suffered in shame, uncontrollably leaking urine. A doctor misdiagnosed her condition as a urinary tract infection. Without a way to stop the incontinence, Elizabeth went to great lengths to hide her injury.

Elizabeth's Story

Elizabeth is mother to ten children. Thankfully, each child resulted from a healthy delivery. Today, she is 60 years old and healed of an iatrogenic fistula she believes was caused by a doctor who operated on a cyst in her belly.

But for nearly a year, she suffered in shame, uncontrollably leaking urine. A doctor misdiagnosed her condition as a urinary tract infection. Without a way to stop the incontinence, Elizabeth went to great lengths to hide her injury.

She never told anyone about her condition, but one day some neighbors saw her throwing away a diaper. Rumors started to spread throughout her village. Only her daughter comforted her.

Then, one day a friend told her about a surgery that might help. Elizabeth’s friend had spoken with a friend who had learned at church about SALFA, an organization that provided free reparative surgeries to women who could not control their urine, like Elizabeth.

Elizabeth made her way to SALFA’s hospital in Morondava. Thanks to support from Fistula Foundation, she received free surgery that has restored her health.

Today, she is happy and looking forward to the future – and delighted that the leaking has stopped.

About Madagascar

  • Population: 24,430,325
  • Average Births per Woman: 4.12
  • Female Literacy: 62.6%
  • Population Living in Poverty: 75.3% (less than $1.25/day)
Read More

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Read Another Woman’s Story

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    Jacklyn is just 29 years old, but has faced enough heartbreak to last a lifetime. Born and raised in Kisii County in western Kenya, Jacklyn was raised by her older sister because their parents abandoned them when she was a small child. She was never able to go to school because she had to do odd jobs along with her older sister in order to have enough food to eat at the end of the day.

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  • Evelyn

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  • Zeinabou

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  • Christine A.

    Kenya

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