Meet Christiana

Pregnant at 16, Christiana suffered with fistula for several years before her successful treatment at our partner hospital in Monrovia, Liberia. Now, with the new skills she is learning through a patient rehabilitation program, she hopes to help support her family.

Christiana's Story

Christiana* was 16 when she became pregnant with her fiancé’s child. Her labor was difficult, and resulted in a stillbirth. She remembers that the health worker who was present at the delivery put his hand in and out of her several times without using gloves.

Three days later, she noticed she was leaking urine—she had developed an obstetric fistula. She didn’t know that her injury could be treated. While living with fistula, she lost her fiancé, and has been cared for by her father ever since. She is now 22.

Christiana’s father learned about fistula treatment from a friend, and sent her to a hospital in southeast Liberia for surgery. Unfortunately, it was not successful.

Christiana continued to live with fistula until she was finally brought to Family Medical Center in Monrovia, where our longtime partner Women and Health Alliance International (WAHA) is working to restore and expand the hospital’s fistula treatment services. There, she underwent treatment for the second time, and her fistula was successfully repaired. She now has hope that she will fully recover, so she can help her father make ends meet with the skills she is learning during her fistula rehabilitation.

*Name changed

About Liberia

  • Population: 4,299,944
  • Average Births per Woman: 4.6
  • Female Literacy: 32.8%
  • Population Living in Poverty: 63.8% (less than $1.25/day)
Read More

We’re Making a Difference in Liberia

Fistula Foundation News

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Liberia: Restoring Fistula Treatment After Ebola

Embed from Getty Images During the 2014 Ebola outbreak, Liberia was one of the hardest-hit countries in West Africa, with the highest number of Ebola deaths. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), Liberia reported 300 to 400 new Ebola cases every week in August and September 2014, a devastating pace for the country’s already…

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Your Donations at Work: Liberia

Liberia: During the 2014 Ebola outbreak, Liberia was one of the hardest-hit countries in West Africa, with the highest number of Ebola deaths. According to the World Health Organization, Liberia reported 300 to 400 new cases every week in August and September 2014, a devastating pace for the country’s already weak health system. Working in…

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