Meet Beauty

Beauty developed a fistula five years ago after a very complicated delivery. She told doctors at St. Francis Mission Hospital that she prayed every day for a miracle, never knowing that her leaking was actually caused by a medical condition for which free treatment was available.

Beauty's Story

During each of those five years, Beauty became more and more isolated from her community. She was unable to work, and refrained from all community activities unless she could absolutely not avoid it. Thankfully, she heard an announcement on the radio that surgeons would be providing free treatment for women like her at our partner site in Katete, St. Francis Mission Hospital.

‘There are other women like me???’ Beauty thought to herself. She came to the hospital for treatment the next week where doctors were able to successfully repair her fistula. Following her surgery, Beauty said, “I am very happy to say that I underwent a successful operation and thank St. Francis Mission Hospital for organizing this special treatment for me and my fellow clients. I pray that the hospital can arrange more of such treatment to enable many others that did not have a chance to receive the miracle treatment and resume normal lives. I know women with such conditions that did not have chance to come for treatment like me.”

About Zambia

  • Population: 15,510,711
  • Average Births per Woman: 5.67
  • Female Literacy: 56%
  • Population Living in Poverty: 60.5% (less than $1.25/day)
Read More

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