Meet Awetu

After Awetu developed a fistula following a difficult labor and delivery, her husband left her and married another. She was heartbroken.

Awetu's Story

Soon thereafter, however, she met a new man and decided to confide in him about her condition and the challenges that she faced because of it. This man cared for Awetu and supported her as she sought treatment to repair her fistula.

In November 2014, Awetu was able to access free treatment at Peramiho Hospital through our partner the Association of Obstetric Fistula Surgeons of Tanzania. Her fistula repair surgery was a success — she is now dry and looking forward to her upcoming marriage to her new husband, who stuck by her side throughout the treatment process.

About Tanzania

  • Population: 49,639,138
  • Average Births per Woman: 4.95
  • Female Literacy: 60.8%
  • Population Living in Poverty: 67.9% (less than $1.25/day)
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We’re Making a Difference in Tanzania

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The Power of Mobile Technology to Help End Fistula

Abbey Kocan of Kupona Foundation writes on NewsDeeply about the power of mobile technology, and how NGOs are using it to get women the help they need. Continuing reading the full article below at the NewsDeeply website. The Power of Mobile Technology to Help End Fistula

Your Donations at Work - KCMC Tanzania

Your Donations at Work: Tanzania

In 2014, we funded a fistula outreach project in northern Tanzania in conjunction with Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre (KCMC) and Duke Global Health Institute (DGHI). This project featured a 2-month radio campaign to raise awareness, development of materials such as brochures and posters, and three 10-day rural outreach sessions. These outreach sessions were highly successful…

Read Another Woman’s Story

  • Queen



    “When my husband saw the many health issues I had, he despised me, he called me names and always told me in the face that I was more than crippled.” She was left on her own and most of the time starving. She reached at a point that she could not withstand the mistreatment and she went back to her parents. After a few years her parents died. “I walk like a crippled woman, there is nothing that I own on this earth, I don’t have a husband, I don’t have a baby. My life is so empty.” She has said that her deepest desire has been to die a clean woman. But at Gynocare, where she received fistula surgery through the Action on Fistula program, she is happy. Here, she feels loved and valued. She knows she has a family at Gynocare.
  • SARAN_Patient Image-min



    After developing a fistula with the birth of her fourth child, Saran received free fistula surgery at our partner site Jean Paul II Hospital in Conakry, Guinea.



    Justine is 37 years old and lives in Bumasiki , a small village in Bugiri District in Uganda. When her labor pains began, she prepared to go to the hospital but didn’t have enough money to get there. She arrived 20 hours later after gathering sufficient funds from friends and neighbors; but by then, she had developed an obstetric fistula.
  • Nura fistula foundation2



    Nura comes from Lai, a region in the south of Chad where she married at age 17. She first became pregnant at 20 and tried to give birth at home, aided only by her family. After 4 days of complicated labor, she was finally taken to the maternity center in Guidari, a nearby village.
  • One Womans Story-Alphonsia



    Alphonsia’s heart-wrenching story began 27 years ago after her labor failed to progress properly.
  • Esther and baby-web version



    Naomi arrived at Tanga Health Center in northeastern Tanzania as a glowing 24 year old expectant mother and businesswoman with a supportive family and a bright future. She returned home with a healthy baby, but also a devastating condition that threatened to diminish that future - obstetric fistula.
  • Fistula Foundation - Elizabeth Atieno



    Pregnant at the age of 13, Sylvia labored for two days before delivering a stillborn baby. She developed obstetric fistula, which led to two decades of shame and sadness. Then one day, she heard a radio announcement that would change her life forever.
  • Senowara Begum, 30 (3)



    When Rahima was just 13 she was married to save her family money on living costs. She soon became pregnant and suffered through prolonged, obstructed labor that left her incontinent. She lived with obstetric fistula for 12 years before finally finding help through our partners at HOPE Foundation for Women and Children of Bangladesh.
  • Hauwa Patient Story fistula foundation nigeria



    Hauwa was 60 years old when she became aware that the fistula she had suffered with for over 40 years could be repaired for free at our partner hospital, Evangel Vesico-Vaginal Fistula Center (EVFC).
  • Halima, from Somalia (photo credit: WAHA)



    Halima is yet another brave fistula survivor from Somalia. “When I went to labour, the pain got stronger and stronger and lasted on and on. Something was not right. It took two days to convince my husband to bring me to a health facility. The doctors that saw me decided to immediately carry out a cesarean section. But they had no anesthesia. The pain was unbearable, and when I screamed they started beating me. My baby could not be saved and I developed what I later learned was an obstetric fistula. My husband left me because he could not stand the smell caused by my injury.”
  • 04_Kaudha_post-surgery



    Kaudha is from eastern Uganda. She developed a fistula after spending hours in labor with her third child. Unfortunately, the baby did not survive, and Kaudha’s condition left her feeling isolated from friends and loved ones. But in fall 2015, her story—and her outlook—changed dramatically.
  • Jahanara-web version



    Jahanara is just 23 years old. She was in labor for a full day at home before going to a hospital for an emergency C-section. By then, unfortunately, the damage had already been done.
  • Fatma



    When 18 year-old Fatma became pregnant, she did not have early and quality access to the healthcare she wanted when she gave birth. Fatma developed a fistula as a result of prolonged labor.
  • Serafina



    Serafina is 18 years old and from the Mukubal tribe in southwestern Angola. Married off at a young age and one of several wives, Serafina became pregnant when she was 14. She is very small-boned and was suffering from malnutrition when she came to the hospital, as food is often scarce in that part of the country. As a result of that and other factors, her delivery did not go well.
  • Brenda



    Thanks to a newly opened fistula hospital close to her home in Kisii, Kenya, 17-year-old Brenda was able to get treatment after six months. Now that she is healed, she has dreams of returning to school to become a nurse.
  • One.Womans.Story.Debora



    Debora lives in a tiny Angolan village quite far from any emergency medical services. In 2008, she was in labor with her fourth child for nearly a week before her uncle finally brought her to a hospital.
  • AR2013_CoverOption_1



    Sokhina endured four days of excruciating labor before delivering a stillborn baby. But her nightmare was just beginning: soon after she began to leak urine and learned that she had an obstetric fistula. She suffered with this injury for eight years before learning that help was available.
  • Umuhoza, a recovering fistula patient at CHUK



    Umuhoza arrived at the hospital with two massive fistulas and could barely walk. She was so traumatized by her labor that she could not remember any details. Today she is healed, but the road to recovery has been long and difficult.

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