Meet Annonciata

Annonciata is a 56-year old mother and farmer from a small village in Budaka District in Uganda. She had previously given birth to six children without significant complications, but her seventh delivery did not go as planned.

Annonciata's Story

When she went into labor with her seventh child, Annonciata’s family took her to the home of a traditional birth attendant where she labored for three days. When the baby still had not come, she was transported to the nearest government hospital.

Annonciata awoke in the hospital to the terrible news that she had lost her baby. Nurses also informed her that she had developed a childbirth injury called obstetric fistula and was now leaking urine, but there was nothing they could do. Devastated, Annonciata returned home. Luckily, a Fistula Ambassador from Uganda Village Project visited her village shortly thereafter to conduct a fistula awareness session. This ambassador was able to inform Annonciata that free treatment was available, and referred her for surgery at an upcoming fistula clinic.

Annonciata underwent a successful repair surgery and is now dry. She is grateful not only for the surgery, but for the loving care and support she received at the clinic. She has now become an unofficial Fistula Ambassador herself and tells others about fistula and available treatment options.

About Uganda

  • Population: 38,319,241
  • Average Births per Woman: 4.8
  • Female Literacy: 71.5%
  • Population Living in Poverty: 18.7% (less than $1.25/day)
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