Ana-Angola

Meet Ana

Today, Ana is 18 years old, with an enthusiastic outlook and bubbly smile. That wasn’t always the case. Ana was just shy of 16 years old when she became pregnant. Everything went well, until it was time to deliver. Her labor was excruciating, and lasted for days.

Ana's Story

On the fourth day of labor, nurses pushed and pulled, and pulled, and pulled, so hard that eventually, the baby’s arm was detached. After this, the baby no longer moved.

She survived this horrific delivery, only to discover that she had begun to leak urine.

Her incontinence prevented Ana from leaving her home. She never went out. Until one day, after her aunt told her about a program she had heard about, provided by Fistula Foundation grantee partner Centro Evangélico de Medicina do Lubango (CEML). Here, women could access fistula repair surgery.

Full of new hope, Ana showed up at CEML for surgery. It went very well and staff at CEML describe her recovery as nearly instant, noting that she nearly bounced out of her hospital bed to announce that she was dry!

While she was recovering, Ana had the opportunity to practice her letters and began to recognize some words. Today, she has hope for the future — as well as that enthusiastic outlook and bubbly smile.

About Angola

  • Population: 20,172,332
  • Average Births per Woman: 5.31
  • Female Literacy: 60.7%
  • Population Living in Poverty: 40.5% (less than $1.25/day)
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