Alradya-Sudan

Meet Alradya

Alradya is 17 years old and lives in northern Sudan. When she was 15, she was married to her cousin, a farmer. She became pregnant and when she went into labor, had only her mother at her side. She endured excruciating labor for two days, but there was still no sign of the baby, which she could no longer feel moving. A traditional birth attendant was summoned to examine Alradya, who ordered that she be sent to the nearest hospital.

Alradya's Story

A doctor examined her and confirmed Alradya’s greatest fear: the baby was dead, and a C-Section would be required to deliver the baby. After the operation and still in shock and mourning over the death of her unborn baby, Alradya began to feel a nonstop flow of urine. Her doctor explained that she had developed a fistula from her difficult labor, but he was unable to treat her. She returned to her village and fell into a deep depression and avoided public gatherings.

Alradya’s uncle told her father that he knew of a specialized fistula treatment center in Khartoum, Dr. Abbo’s National Fistula & Urogynecology Center. Fistula Foundation partner Women and Health Alliance International (WAHA) has been working with the Center to increase their capacity to treat fistula patients. Accompanied by her mother, Alradya went to the hospital and was booked for a fistula repair surgery.

Her repair operation was successful and Alradya became dry. While at the Center, she engaged in psychological rehabilitation sessions and was taught income-generating handcrafts so she could start her own business. She has since returned home to her husband and family. WAHA reports that after meeting with Alradya for her six month follow-up appointment, she has become a motivated fistula advocate and an empowered young woman who is ready to start a family.

About Sudan

  • Population: 35,482,233
  • Average Births per Woman: 3.92
  • Female Literacy: 63.2%
  • Population Living in Poverty: 46.5% (less than $1.25/day)
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