One Womans Story-Alphonsia

Meet Alphonsia

Alphonsia’s heart-wrenching story began 27 years ago after her labor failed to progress properly.

Alphonsia's Story

When she eventually got to the hospital, doctors discovered the baby had died. Shortly after they removed the baby, Alphonsia began leaking urine and experiencing sharp stomach pains. She went to another hospital where they attempted to repair her fistula, but to no avail. Over the next three years she was shunned and isolated by her community and continued to suffer excruciating pain. After another unsuccessful fistula repair surgery, Alphonsia gave up hope of ever leading a normal life again.

In July 2014, Alphonsia came to Arusha Lutheran Medical Center, one of our partners through Maternity Africa. There, expert surgeon Dr. Andrew Browning successfully repaired her fistula and found the cause of the sharp pain: a jagged fragment of bone. Alphonsia went home ten days later dry and pain-free for the first time in 27 years.

About Tanzania

  • Population: 49,639,138
  • Average Births per Woman: 4.95
  • Female Literacy: 60.8%
  • Population Living in Poverty: 67.9% (less than $1.25/day)
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We’re Making a Difference in Tanzania

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The Power of Mobile Technology to Help End Fistula

Abbey Kocan of Kupona Foundation writes on NewsDeeply about the power of mobile technology, and how NGOs are using it to get women the help they need. Continuing reading the full article below at the NewsDeeply website. The Power of Mobile Technology to Help End Fistula

Your Donations at Work - KCMC Tanzania

Your Donations at Work: Tanzania

In 2014, we funded a fistula outreach project in northern Tanzania in conjunction with Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre (KCMC) and Duke Global Health Institute (DGHI). This project featured a 2-month radio campaign to raise awareness, development of materials such as brochures and posters, and three 10-day rural outreach sessions. These outreach sessions were highly successful…

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    Halima is yet another brave fistula survivor from Somalia. “When I went to labour, the pain got stronger and stronger and lasted on and on. Something was not right. It took two days to convince my husband to bring me to a health facility. The doctors that saw me decided to immediately carry out a cesarean section. But they had no anesthesia. The pain was unbearable, and when I screamed they started beating me. My baby could not be saved and I developed what I later learned was an obstetric fistula. My husband left me because he could not stand the smell caused by my injury.”
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    Sokhina endured four days of excruciating labor before delivering a stillborn baby. But her nightmare was just beginning: soon after she began to leak urine and learned that she had an obstetric fistula. She suffered with this injury for eight years before learning that help was available.
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    Alradya is 17 years old and lives in northern Sudan. When she was 15, she was married to her cousin, a farmer. She became pregnant and when she went into labor, had only her mother at her side. She endured excruciating labor for two days, but there was still no sign of the baby, which she could no longer feel moving. A traditional birth attendant was summoned to examine Alradya, who ordered that she be sent to the nearest hospital.
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    Gul lives in Afghanistan. At 13 years old, her father arranged for her to marry an older man who had another wife, and after one year of marriage, Gul became pregnant. When she went into labor, it lasted for two days. There were no clinics or doctors where she lived and Gul's husband became worried. He took her to her father's house, where Gul's father killed a sheep and placed the sheepskin on her as part of a traditional treatment used in her area. After three days of wearing the sheepskin, Gul delivered a stillborn baby.
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    Helen went into labor with her second child about four years ago. She gave birth in her home, where she labored for many hours, completely alone without anyone present to assist her. Her baby was stillborn and she began leaking urine immediately.
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    Kamala is a 47 year old mother of four and from a very remote area of western Nepal known as Dailekh. She lived with fistula for eight years, but thankfully is one of few patients who had the support of her husband the entire time.
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    Maria is 42 years old. She is HIV-positive and currently on antiretroviral therapy. Maria doesn’t have a permanent place to live – she cannot work because of her incontinence, and has no real income to live on. She survives through the ongoing support of her relatives and friends.
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